Tattwa

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So far Tattwa has created 34 blog entries.

One person can make a difference

2017-10-18T23:46:21+00:00

From the Grand Valley State University (GVSU) a group of students produced a video called “Saving Trees” featuring David Milarch. David’s story shows that one person can make a difference. Ian Kast, Chad Rodgers, Rick Iseppi, Lindsey VanDenBoom, Olga Sarayeva, Atikh Bana and Joe Buckenmeyer, worked together to conceive and create a compelling story about David Milarch and his amazing dedication and persistence against all odds to save the giant trees that are helping to save our place on the planet. If you like the video, please share it. For more info visit the project’s facebook page.    

One person can make a difference 2017-10-18T23:46:21+00:00

The Native American Code of Ethics We Should All Live By

2017-10-18T23:43:25+00:00

The Native American culture is highly spiritual and places a great emphasis on respect for Mother Earth, Father Sky, Grandfather Sun and Grandmother Moon as well as all living and non-living objects. 1. Rise with the sun to pray. Pray alone. Pray often. The Great Spirit will listen, if you only speak. 2. Be tolerant of those who are lost on their path. Ignorance, conceit, anger, jealousy and greed stem from a lost soul. Pray that they will find guidance. 3. Search for yourself, by yourself. Do not allow others to make your path for you. It is your road, yours alone. Others may walk it with you, but no one can walk it for you. 4. Treat the guests in your home with much consideration. Serve them the best food, give them the best bed and treat them with respect and honor. 5. Do not take what is not yours whether from a person, a community, the wilderness or from a culture. It was not earned nor given. It is not yours. 6. Respect all things that are placed upon this earth – whether it be people or plant. 7. Honor other people’s thoughts, wishes and words. Never interrupt another or mock or

The Native American Code of Ethics We Should All Live By 2017-10-18T23:43:25+00:00

Nature reclaims this abandoned Chinese fishing village

2017-10-18T23:36:37+00:00

China has become one of the biggest industrialized nations of earth. Cities like Shanghai or Beijing are growing while bringing highly urbanized and crowded scenarios. But it was not a long time ago when China was the place for hundreds of small, tiny rural villages. They question is, where have all they gone? Tang Yuhong has the answer. His pictures show the natural process that’s taking place in those old abandoned places. Thanks to its work we can see how nature draws, designs, adapts and modifies what once was made by the human hand. Once a bustling settlement merely half a century ago, Houtou Wan Village is now a ghost town. It was deserted over a period of time, because the small bay could not accommodate the needs and volume of incoming fishing boats. Since its desertion, nature has taken over and reigned supreme. It is now a haunting and beautiful place which shows old buildings and homes taken over by vines, trees, and natural elements. No one except a few older residents live here. It is so beautiful to see the result obtained when a natural process is involved in the creation. That proves the rules and the logic of nature are totally

Nature reclaims this abandoned Chinese fishing village 2017-10-18T23:36:37+00:00

Do you want to become a tree after life? You can with a Bios Urn.

2017-10-18T23:31:28+00:00

  Do you want your body to feed worms or to feed squirrels? ? Once your beloved has departed and the only memento that remains is the ashes, you can throw them into the sea, scatter them from above a mountain, in a special spot… and they will vanish. You can also keep them in urn and put them in a special place. OR you can merge the ashes with tree seeds, so that they can combine and form new life. You will have something alive in front of your eyes, something to care for. The Bios Urn turns death into a transformation and a return to nature. The tree will survive and grow for generations, in the same way a person would. And that tree will also have its own descendants, new young trees. That’s quite a reincarnation, an allegory of the circle of life. Even the most beautiful tombstone that makes you shed a tear, will be a cold and sterile work of art. Even the most twisted tree is a unique and alive work of art. In fact, if we think in the current funerary art it may seem an industrialized kind of art, homogeneous – only the wealthy ones can afford the gap

Do you want to become a tree after life? You can with a Bios Urn. 2017-10-18T23:31:28+00:00

Instructions: How to use and plant your Bios Urn in nature

2017-10-18T23:27:52+00:00

  We are dedicating this blog post entirely to planting instructions for the Bios Urn. If you have any other questions, please feel free to add a comment down below, and we will help answer them. We try to make the Bios Urn as user-friendly as possible. The Bios Urn itself is divided into two capsules: a lower capsule, and an upper capsule. The upper capsule comes sealed and contains a soil expansion disc, growth medium, and seeds of your choosing. Instructions for using the Bios Urn 1. Fill the lower capsule of the Bios Urn with ash (any amount, regardless of how little can be used.) The Bios Urn can be filled by a crematorium, or by the individual user. Thanks to its double capsule design, the Bios Urn locks into place, so that a crematorium can give the ash back to you ready to plant. Once the ashes have been transferred to the lower capsule, close the lower capsule with the top capsule by sealing it into place (place the top capsule on top, and then twist it slightly to the side). TIP: If you only use a portion of the ash, be sure to fill the remainder of the Bios Urn with soil from

Instructions: How to use and plant your Bios Urn in nature 2017-10-18T23:27:52+00:00

Indoor Trees You Can Use With A Bios Urn

2017-10-18T23:24:23+00:00

  Indoor trees you can grow in your home, using a Bios Urn. Trees and photos by the sill. We often receive many emails from individuals all over the world, who love the idea of the Bios Urn but would prefer to have an indoor tree due to land restrictions, or because they live in temporary locations. Not only do indoor trees look beautiful and add a touch of color to any space they are placed in, they aslo help purify the air and create both nighttime and daytime oxygen! We’ve compiled a list of beautiful indoor tree options which can be used with a Bios Urn, in either a planter or in the Bios Incube. Here are some tree options that would fare the best for indoor use: Fiddle-Leaf Fig Overview: This beautiful indoor tree has large forest green leaves, which form the shape of a fiddle! They can grow to be up to 10ft tall. Care required: The Fiddle-Leaf fig tree likes to stay in temperatures between 65-75 fahrenheit. They also enjoy healthy doses of light, but indirect light is best! Water when the top surface of the soil begins to feel dry. These trees are beautiful, but should be avoided if you have

Indoor Trees You Can Use With A Bios Urn 2017-10-18T23:24:23+00:00

Hanami is the popular Japanese tradition of flower viewing while picnicking

2017-10-18T23:13:16+00:00

Hanami is a beautiful Japanese tradition focused on enjoying a day under the trees, with friends and a picnic.   Hanami is the Japanese tradition of flower viewing, which has been practiced for many centuries. In Japanese, Hanami quite literally translates to the phrase ¨flower viewing.¨ Japanese culture has a strong connection to nature, and there are other activities which express this connection, like Shinrin Yoku (the practice of ¨forest bathing¨) Generally the flowering viewing practice of Hanami is focused on flowering trees, such as the Sakura tree or Plum tree. During spring these trees blossom to life and bring with them beautiful shades of color. Hanami takes place during this period of time, which lasts from March until May.     In older times people used to bring offerings and gifts to the Sakura tree, as it was thought to aid in the harvest for the year. Nowadays people all over Japan enjoy Hanami by partaking in picnics and feasts. These feasts generally in parks and other natural environments. Sometimes these feasts go all day and all night! In the United States, Hanami is also celebrated in a similar manner. Various Cherry Blossoms festivals which take place in different parts of the country. Macon, Georgia, is considered to be the Cherry Blossom capital of

Hanami is the popular Japanese tradition of flower viewing while picnicking 2017-10-18T23:13:16+00:00

This Cathedral Is Made Entirely Of Living Trees

2017-10-18T22:30:45+00:00

photo by: Cattedrale Vegetale   Where nature turns to art When you think of a cathedral, you probably think of a building with a stone facade, or something similar. Well, what if we told you that there´s a cathedral made of trees? Italian artist Giuliano Mauri has created and designed a beautiful Tree Cathedral (Cattedrale Vegetale) which now grows in a remote village near Bergamo, Italy. Situated in a remote valley around one hour away from Bergamo, the tree cathedral is a living testament to Mauri´s ingenuity. The most interesting thing about the design of this natural cathedral, is that it is always changing and evolving and growing. It is said that it will take decades to complete. Building the tree cathedral is no easy feat. The framework for the cathedral was laid by Mauri in 2002, and in 2010 the project was deemed to be completed. For the past 7 years, the trees have been growing and have created a beautiful landscape. The beautiful thing about this structure, is that it builds itself. Another remarkable thing is to see how the structure changes with each passing season!   photo by: Arte Sella   An Intricate design The Cattedrale in Bergamo has five different naves, which

This Cathedral Is Made Entirely Of Living Trees 2017-10-18T22:30:45+00:00

Pre-planting: The importance of end-of-life planning

2017-10-18T07:02:16+00:00

Pre-planning, or as we like to call it “Pre-planting” Over the past decade, there has been an increase in overall awareness related to alternative endings. People´s desires and last wishes have changed, and many individuals and families are opting for sustainable options – which is making many cemeteries rethink things. Alongside these changes, there has been a shift in consciousness, and younger generations are gearing up and preparing their own end-of-life plans. In part this awareness could be due to the rise of the internet, which has made sharing ideas easier and more accessible to persons of all age ranges. A year ago in 2016, we received an email from a young girl who was only 14 years old. She found out about the Bios Urn, and took the time to research our company and message us. In her message she asked us if we could make sure that she was planted with a Bios Urn in the case of her untimely demise. Would she need to start a will? How could she go about doing it? All poignant questions coming from an adolescent girl. We were so excited to receive this e-mail, and it touched us to know that we had created something which this young

Pre-planting: The importance of end-of-life planning 2017-10-18T07:02:16+00:00

`Before I Die´ is a global art wall project that inspires and invites.

2017-10-18T05:34:50+00:00

“Our public spaces are as profound as we allow them to be.¨- Candy Chang Candy Chang is the artist and creator behind the public initiative ¨Before I die…¨ After losing a close friend to liver failure, Chang spent time contemplating her life and how she would like to live out the remainder of her days. After thinking about death, she had the idea that this surely must be a universal thing that many people contemplate – and she was right. The original wall was put up on an abandoned building in New Orleans, Louisiana. So many people resonated with the wall, that Chang decided to make it a global art project. Now, more than 2,000 walls have been created in over 76 countries, with 35 languages.   Original house in New Orleans, created by Candy Chang.   A global movement ¨BEFORE I DIE IS A PARTICIPATORY PUBLIC ART PROJECT that invites people to contemplate death, reflect on life, and share their personal aspirations in public. After losing someone she loved, Chang channeled her grief and depression into this project on an abandoned house in her New Orleans neighborhood to restore perspective and find some consolation with her neighbors. She covered the crumbling house with chalkboard paint and

`Before I Die´ is a global art wall project that inspires and invites. 2017-10-18T05:34:50+00:00
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